LABRANCHE WETLAND WATCHERS AND TEACHER BARRY GUILLOT WIN TWO 2004 1ST PLACE GULF GUARDIAN AWARDS! WATCH THE DOCUMENTARY CREATED BY THE EPA!

WE WERE HONORED TO RECEIVE TWO 1ST PLACE GULF GUARDIAN AWARDS IN 2004. BELOW IS THE PRESS RELEASE WITH THE INFORMATION AND THE GREAT VIDEO THAT THEY CREATED ABOUT US!   STENNIS SPACE CENTER, Miss. – The Gulf of Mexico Program today presented the LaBranche Wetland Watchers with a first place Gulf Guardian Award for 2004 in the Youth and Education Category. As a double honor, the Wetland Watchers’ coordinator, Barry Guillot, also received the 2004 first place Gulf Guardian Award in the individual category. The award ceremony was held aboard the Creole Queen Riverboat in New Orleans, La. The LaBranche Wetland Watchers is a school-based service-learning project designed to integrate environmental issues into the curriculum. More than 3,800 fifth through seventh grade students have participated in service trips to and adopted sites near the Bonnet Carre Spillway. Students plan and participate in activities such as water quality monitoring, macro-invertebrate collection and identification, litter clean-ups, soil and plant identification, tree planting, and mapping out a public nature trail. Students have spoken to more than 40,000 people across southeastern Louisiana. Through education, service, and awareness, students led a community effort for wetland conservation. The service site has exhibited some of the greatest amount of land loss along the Lake Pontchartrain shoreline. It faces development problems with a proposed airport, has huge litter and dumping problems, and suffers greatly from salt water intrusion. It is the focus of many federal and state restoration projects and refinery mitigation projects and serves as a microcosm of problems that wetlands are facing locally and globally. The primary objective of the LaBranche Wetland Watchers is...
Community Works To Build Nature Trail Boardwalk During Wetland Watchers Park National Make A Difference Day Event!

Community Works To Build Nature Trail Boardwalk During Wetland Watchers Park National Make A Difference Day Event!

It was an overwhelming success! One of the really great aspects of this event was that it featured the partnerships of Learn and Serve America (Hurst Wetland Watchers), Americorps (ShreveCORPS), and the St. Charles Parish Retired Seniors Volunteer Program. All three of our agencies are funded through the Corporation for National and Community Service. The Corporation is the nation’s largest grant-maker supporting service and volunteering. Through the Senior Corps, AmeriCorps, and Learn and Serve America programs, they provide opportunities for Americans of all ages and backgrounds to express their patriotism while addressing critical community needs. Kenny Guedry, Superintendent of St. Charles Recreation, was instrumental in organizing the construction utilizing the skills of Parish Rec workers as volunteer team leaders. We got about 200 feet of trail between the two built which is amazing because the water was incredibly high on Friday. We had approximately 55 volunteers on Friday in different capacities including Americorps ShreveCORPS volunteers from Shreveport, retired Seniors Volunteer Program, Recreation employees, Valero, the St. Charles Parish Rotary Club and other community volunteers. Fourteen volunteers from Johnson Controls of Metairie also worked 9 hours on Friday. On Saturday, volunteers included about 43 volunteers representing Americorps, RSVP, Louisiana Serve Commission, Learn and Serve America, St. Charles Recreation, Motiva, the St. Charles Rotary Club, and St. Charles Parish Sheriff’s Office Prison Trustees.  ...
Wetland Watcher Students Facilitate NSTA Teachers During Wetland Visit!

Wetland Watcher Students Facilitate NSTA Teachers During Wetland Visit!

100 teachers from around the nation that were participants in the National Science Teachers Association convention in New Orleans visited the LaBranche Wetland Watchers Park on the shore of Lake Pontchartrain in St. Charles Parish. Still a work in progress, the park consists of 900 feet of boardwalk through a wetland that, like much of Louisiana’s wetlands, is struggling to survive. This one, however, has the help of Wetland Watchers, an organization at Destrehan’s Harry Hurst Middle School, teacher Barry Guillot and Guillots partners in the project, including parish government, local universities and industries....